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Recent Articles

Finding all Plack Middleware or Perl::Critic Policies

Recently I was working on a patch for MetaCPAN, but then it turned out that I don't need to implement it as it is already working. I wanted to be able to list all the modules within a namespace. Apparently it is very easy. I only need to prefix my search with module:


Finding all Plack Middleware or Perl::Critic Policies


Pro: What is the status of the current test script?

The other day I looked at the tests of the Expect module, and was surprised to see that it was still using the old-style, home-brewed testing system. Something like the one we used when we introduced test automation. I wanted to convert it to use Test::More, but in addition to an ok() function, this home-made system had a unique functionality.

At the end of the script it printed a message something along the line "Don't worry if a test fails, this can happen.", but it only printed if any of the ok() functions of the test script failed.

I wanted to preserve this functionality.


What is the status of the current test script?


Pro: Logging in modules with Log4perl the easy way

In the previous article we saw how we can get started logging with Log::Log4perl in a script. This time we'll see the example extended to a module.


Logging in modules with Log4perl the easy way


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