Version numbers are very flexible in Perl and unfortunately people have been abusing this freedom. even though Version numbers should be boring.

A couple of examples for version numbers:

5.010
v5.10
5.010.002

1.10
1.10_02

1.10_TEST

You might also know that 5.010 is the same as v5.10 which creates a great deal of confusion to people who are not aware of this.

There are at least two modules that handle version numbers: version and Perl::Version, but it seems only the former works properly.

So I recomment the version module.

It operator overloading to allow us to use the various numerical comparision operators such as >, < and even the spaceship operators <=> to sort a bunch of version numbers.

examples/version_example.pl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use version;

say version->parse( 1.23 ) < version->parse( 1.24 );

It seems to be working properly as the following cases show:

examples/version.pl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use version;

my @cases = (
    [ 'v5.11', '5.011' ],
    [ 'v5.11', '5.012' ],
    [ '5.1.1', '5.1.2' ],
    [ '5.10',  '5.10_01'],
    [ '5.10',  'v5.10'],
    [ '5.10',  'v5.11'],
);

foreach my $c (@cases) {
    say '----';
    say $c->[0];
    say $c->[1];
    say version->parse( $c->[0] ) < version->parse( $c->[1] );
    say version->parse( $c->[0] ) == version->parse( $c->[1] );
}


You can also sort version numbers:

examples/sort_versions.pl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use version;

my @versions = ( 'v5.11', '5.011', '5.012', '5.1.1', '5.1.2', '5.10',  '5.10_01');


my @sorted = sort { version->parse( $a ) <=> version->parse( $b ) } @versions;
for my $s (@sorted) {
    say $s;
}

Invalid version format

The module will not properly parse the last example:

say version->parse('1.23_TEST');

Will generate an excpetion saying Invalid version format (misplaced underscore) at ...