In the previous screencast we created the is_any test function. This time we are going to move it to a separate module to be useful in other test scripts and to other test developers as well.

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We can now reuse the is_any function in this test script, but what if we would like to use it in several scripts? What if we would like to allow other people in our organization to use it? And what, if we want to share it via CPAN so everyone using Perl will benefit from it?

In either case we need to create a module that provides this function. If we also want to share it publicly, we will need to create a distribution, but in any case first we need to create a module. We will use it like this:

use Test::More tests => 8;
use Test::Any qw(is_any);

and then in that test-script we can freely use the is_any function.

As our our first step we create a standr-looking file called Test/Any.pm and move the is_any function there:

package Test::Any;
use strict;
use warnings;

our $VERSION = '0.01';

use Exporter qw(import);
our @EXPORT_OK = qw(is_any);

use List::MoreUtils qw(any);

sub is_any {
    my ($actual, $expected, $name) = @_;
    $name ||= '';

    local $Test::Builder::Level = $Test::Builder::Level + 1;
    ok( (any {$_ eq $actual} @$expected), $name)
        or diag "Received: $actual\nExpected:\n" .
            join "", map {"         $_\n"} @$expected;
}

1;

We declared the $VERSION variable, just because it is good practice, and we also had to export the is_any function. For this we load the Exporter module and import the import functionn from it. (I know, it is a bit strange, I'll explain it in a separate article.)

Then, we also need to declare which functions are we ready to export. We do this by listing them in the @EXPORT_OK variable declared using our.

That's it.

Excpet that we have a problem. In our code we call the is function and the like function and they are provided by Test::More. We should also load the Test::More module, but that's not really proper. That module should be only loaded by actual test scripts that will also set a plan.

Instead, what we need to do is reach to the engine behind Test::More, and behind the plethora of Test::* modules on CPAN that provides this functionality. Namely, we need to use Test::Builder::Module.

After loading that module we can call my $Test = Test::Builder::Module->builder; which will return the object that describes the currently running test. As this module is a singleton, there is alwasy going to be only one such object in every process.

This is the object that supplies the ok method and the diag method that are behind the respective funnctions of Test::More. Our code changes to the following:

package Test::Any;
use strict;
use warnings;

our $VERSION = '0.01';

use Exporter qw(import);
our @EXPORT_OK = qw(is_any);

use List::MoreUtils qw(any);

use Test::Builder::Module;


my $Test = Test::Builder::Module->builder;


sub is_any {
    my ($actual, $expected, $name) = @_;
    $name ||= '';

    $Test->ok( (any {$_ eq $actual} @$expected), $name) 
        or $Test->diag("Received: $actual\nExpected:\n" 
             . join "", map {"         $_\n"} @$expected);
}

1;

Please note, we don't need to adjust the Level variable any more. That's because now our is_any function is at the same level as the ok/is/like/etc... functions exported by Test::More. We created a function equivalent to the functions of Test::More and of Test::* modules.

We just need to be able to distribute this and the user needs to be able to load it via a use statement.